Negative Effect of Camu-Camu (Myrciaria dubia) Despite High Vitamin C Content on Iron Bioavailability, Using a Caco-2 Cell Model
 
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Pol. J. Food Nutr. Sci. 2014;64(1):45–48
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ABSTRACT:
It is well known that vitamin C is an important enhancer of nonheme iron bioavailability due to its high reducing capacity. Camu-camu, a fruit that grows in the jungle of Peru contains high amount of vitamin C (2,780 mg per 100 g). In this study, we investigated the effect of camu-camu on nonheme iron bioavailability from two different meals (rice with lentils and wheat flour porridge) using an in vitro Caco-2 cell model. These two meals were treated with three different camu-camu juice concentrations (C0 = 0 g, C1 = typical consumption, and C2 = 3X typical consumption). The results showed that camu-camu reduced rather than enhancing nonheme iron bioavailability. The inhibiting trend was significant (p <0.0001) in the wheat flour porridge (from 124 to 91 and 35 μg ferritin/µg protein, for C0, C1 and C2, respectively). With the rice with lentils, there was no significant effect of camu-camu due to the high polyphenols and phytate contents of the meal. Relative bioavailability values obtained showed significant decrease with increasing camu-camu juice concentration for both meals. As expected, the ascorbic acid added to the meals at a concentration equivalent to that present in C2, had no effect with rice meal compared to wheat flour meal. The findings of this study suggest that camu-camu, in the traditional way of preparation, may significantly reduce nonheme iron bioavailability because of its high polyphenol content which overrides the beneficial effect of its high ascorbic acid content.