OLFACTORY EFFICIENCY AND FOOD PREFERENCES RELATIONS IN THE ELDERLY WITH DIFFERENT VISION ABILITY.
 
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Pol. J. Food Nutr. Sci. 2003;53(3):77–82
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ABSTRACT
In this study, a comparative analysis of olfactory efficiency and preferences for selected categories of food products was conducted in the good-sighted elderly (GSE) and in the blind elderly (BE) and relationships between those parameters were determined. The measurements of olfactory sensitivity were conducted by air-blast olfactorimetric method, while food preferences were assessed by a questionnaire using a 5-point hedonic scale. The relationship between vision ability and smell detection thresholds (SDT) appeared statistically significant for both odour substances. In the BE group the detection thresholds within the reference values were noted in 78% subjects in the case of mint oil and in 88% in the case of ground coffee whereas in the good-sighted elderly the normosmia was found substantially less frequently, i.e. in 54% and 34% subjects, respectively. Among the examined elderly, diminished odour identification ability was commonly observed whereas no relationship existed between the smell identification thresholds (SIT) and vision ability. With the decline of the total olfactory efficiency (TOE) index in the examined population the preferences for sweet (p
ISSN:1230-0322