BIOAVAILABILITY OF CALCIUM AND PHOSPHORUS FROM DIETS CONTAINING WHITE CHEESES SUPPLEMENTED WITH PREBIOTICS IN RATS
 
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Pol. J. Food Nutr. Sci. 2008;58(3):383–387
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ABSTRACT
The intake of food products containing prebiotics has a beneficial effect on the functioning of the gastrointestinal tract and may also contribute to increased mineral absorption from a diet. In the food industry prebiotics (inulins and maltodextrins) are also used because of their functional properties such as stabilizing emulsions. A study was undertaken to investigate the effect of inulin HPX and maltodextrin, applied in the production of white soft cheese as stabilizers, at a dose of 2.5%, on the bioavailability of calcium and phosphorus in rats. In the study, Wistar rats (n = 6 per group) were fed diets composed of cheese without prebiotic (control) or cheeses containing either 2.5% of inulin or maltodextrin, for 10 days. The bioavailability of the minerals was expressed by means of apparent absorption (A) and retention (R) coefficients (mg/5 days, %). The apparent Ca absorption and retention (mg/5 days) were the highest in the control group (p <0.05), whereas the A (%) and R (%) coefficients did not differ significantly between the groups. Also, the apparent absorption of P (mg/5 days) was the highest (p<0.05) in the control group and no differences in A (%), R (mg/5 days), R (%) coefficients were noted among the groups. Inulin HPX and maltodextrin used in white cheese production do not increase Ca nor P bioavailability, which suggests that the technologically-justified 2.5% dose is too low to exert a positive effect on mineral balance.
ISSN:1230-0322